Bill Tidnam speaks about rough sleeping stats in government panel discussion

Thames Reach Chief Executive, Bill Tidnam, spoke at the government’s ‘Delivering Together to End Rough Sleeping’ event on 1 March 2022.

Bill Tidnam speaks about rough sleeping stats in government panel discussion

New figures released by the Department of Levelling Up, Housing and Communities (DLUHC) show the numbers of people sleeping rough have fallen for the fourth year in a row, with a 9% decrease from this time last year. The whole of England saw this decrease, but it is estimated that the biggest drop in numbers was found in London, with around 10% fewer people than autumn 2020.

While these numbers are initially encouraging, an online event on 1 March chaired by Eddie Hughes MP stressed that there is more work to be done.

As part of this event, Thames Reach Chief Executive Bill Tidnam featured on the government’s ‘Delivering Together to End Rough Sleeping’ panel, alongside Eddie Hughes MP, Minister for Housing and Rough Sleeping; Andy Burnham, Mayor of Greater Manchester; and Kath Wallace, Divisional Manager of Liverpool City Council. They discussed the recent statistics, with all panellists agreeing on the importance of prevention services and suitable housing solutions to not only ensure that numbers continue to decrease, but that we can intervene and support people before the traumatic experience of street homelessness occurs.

During the panel, Bill was asked about best practices for supporting people with complex needs, asserting the importance of patience, flexibility, and working with an individual to see what routes and services are best for them. The need to help people with no recourse to public funds was also a key part of the discussion, with everyone celebrating the success of ‘Everyone In’, viewing it as a framework to take forward in the mission to end rough sleeping.

Kath Wallace and Andy Burnham also spoke about community efforts, that rough sleeping is an issue that can be resolved through communities being strengthened as well as specialist input. At Thames Reach, we know the value of communities, not only in terms of helping an individual away from street homelessness, but in how hubs and groups can be excellent ways to work with people at risk of street homelessness, to engage with them outside of traditional services or buildings that may be a daunting prospect for some.

Thames Reach on new rough sleeping investments: don’t forget prevention

Following the government’s announcement of additional funding for rough sleeping services, Thames Reach welcome the commitment but stress that investment in prevention is essential to our work towards ending street homelessness

Thames Reach on new rough sleeping investments: don’t forget prevention

At Thames Reach, we welcome the new RSI (Rough Sleeping Initiative) funding provisions for rough sleeping services, with the government’s announcement last weekend that councils will receive a further £200million in this stage of their plan to support people experiencing rough sleeping. This is positive news that will help continue our efforts to reduce rough sleeping in London.  However while we welcome this investment we believe that there is an urgent need to review the national Rough Sleeping Strategy, learning from the lessons of the pandemic, both positive and negative.  Alongside this we would like to see a return to multi-year funding that can provide the sort of stability that will help us feel confident that we can offer lasting solutions to street homelessness, and help people along the journey of moving on from the streets, which only starts once an individual has been housed.

As part of this we would like to see an increased focus on the prevention stage of street homelessness, working with people to divert them away from the street and into more secure accommodationThe last year has shown how precariously many people are housed, and highlighted the need to intervene earlier. We know that street homelessness is a huge cause of trauma and anxiety, and causes lasting damage, and it is crucial that we are able to work effectively to prevent this.

Any revised strategy will need to address the needs of people without recourse to public funds, particularly those with complex support needs.  Without this help for people who are currently largely ineligible, street homelessness will continue and numbers will increase.

Emergency accommodation given to vulnerable people at Heathrow Airport

Thames Reach’s multi-agency work supporting people rough sleeping in Heathrow has proved a success in recent days

Emergency accommodation given to vulnerable people at Heathrow Airport

Thames Reach have been providing outreach services at Heathrow Airport for several years, and recently with increased measures needed to ensure people who are rough sleeping are kept safe and able to self-isolate during COVID-19, we have been working on-site to find temporary accommodation for people sleeping rough in Heathrow Terminals 2-5 as well as the bus station. This has been a collaborative effort between Thames Reach and partner organisations including Heathrow Travelcare, social services and local authorities. Starting early on Wednesday 1 April, we have seen a real commitment to ensuring people who have been rough sleeping are cared for sensitively and effectively. Over three days, this impressive operation has seen a limited number of staff working in a complicated environment with a range of needs catered to, including complex needs, resulting in over 160 people being successfully given accommodation in this short space of time, an unprecedented effort.

Accommodation setups vary from hotel rooms, including some at the Thames Reach-run hotel in south-west London, to self-contained flats for those with COVID-19 symptoms, and extra provisions for people with pets. These are safe, positive spaces where individuals are able to spend time in clean, contained settings with food provided, in order to protect their immune systems from the risk of the virus.

Hotels are based in local authorities across the city, from Wandsworth to Ilford via the City, which are being staffed by various providers including Thames Reach. This is a thoroughly collaborative project, and we are working with organisations including St Mungo’s and Look Ahead to ensure the needs of each individual are met.

Having worked day and night at Heathrow, we are incredibly relieved to have been able to accommodate such a large number of people off the streets but our work is not done. We will be liaising with central and local government as well as our partners to ensure that those we have managed to temporarily re-house are not left behind once the quarantine is lifted.

Getting people into accommodation is a first step, but we need to make sure that we are able to help them take the next step away from homelessness and into stable and suitable accommodation.  This story will progress and we will be releasing updates accordingly.

Homelessness sector outlines needs in open letter to the Prime Minister

Thames Reach co-sign letter to the Prime Minister alongside other providers in the homelessness sector outlining the next steps to ensure that the most vulnerable are kept safe during the COVID-19 pandemic

Homelessness sector outlines needs in open letter to the Prime Minister

On Thursday 2nd April, Thames Reach Chief Executive Bill Tidnam co-signed a letter to the Prime Minister on behalf of several organisations in the homelessness sector. The letter is a statement of gratitude to the collective push to ensure no one is left sleeping rough, with a new call for support to ensure teams are able to do this safely and effectively.

 

The Rt Hon. Boris Johnson

MP Prime Minister

10 Downing Street

London

SW1A 2AA

Dear Prime Minister,

I hope that you are recovering well. Following on from our previous letter, I want to thank you and your team for the swift action that has been taken to help protect the most vulnerable people in our society in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. People experiencing homelessness, particularly those who are rough sleeping, are most exposed to the risks of the virus, not only because they do not have a safe home to self-isolate or follow sanitation guidance, but because they are three times more likely to experience a chronic health problem including respiratory conditions.

In particular, I want to express my gratitude for the coordination of the “Everyone In’ hotel and emergency accommodation operation led by Dame Louise Casey and the Ministry of Housing Communities and Local Government to house all rough sleepers. This will undoubtedly save lives. Measures taken by the Government to boost the welfare system and protect renters from evictions will also help ensure that the pressures built up by the pandemic do not result in people being forced into homelessness.

There are however, a number of remaining barriers to the government achieving its ambition and while there continues to be far too many people still on our streets or in dangerous congregate accommodation this remains a public health emergency and a race against time. I have enclosed a fuller note on the measures required. These include, most essentially, assistance from national government to temporarily remove the legal barriers that exist to people receiving homelessness assistance, a dedicated funding stream for local authorities to secure accommodation and provide the ongoing support to people so that they can remain there, Covid-care and PPE for staff working in frontline homelessness services and local funding to assist people who are struggling to pay their rent.

Finally, we stand ready to assist the government in planning for an end to the hotel arrangements that sees all individuals provided with housing and support and helps meet the Government’s commitment to end rough sleeping for good in this country.

Yours sincerely,

Jon Sparkes, Crisis

Rich Henderson, Homeless Link

Mick Clarke, The Passage

Pam Orchard, Connection at St Martin’s

Steven Platts, Groundswell

Bill Tidnam, Thames Reach

cc. Rt. Hon. Robert Jenrick MP, Rt Therese Coffey MP, Rt Hon, Priti Patel MP

COVID-19: Updates

What we’re doing to support homeless and vulnerable people during the COVID-19 crisis

COVID-19: Updates

7 July 2020

Along with forty other homelessness organisations across the UK, our Chief Executive Bill Tidnam has signed an open letter to the Prime Minister on behalf of Thames Reach, calling on extra commitment to ensuring that those helped by the ‘Everyone In’ initiative are still supported after lockdown is lifted. The letter outlines that, whilst the £105million pool of funding recently announced by the government will help, there are other barriers unique to this situation which must be addressed. Read the full letter here.

2 July 2020

As part of the recovery from the effects of Covid, Thames Reach are supporting people who have been temporarily accommodated in hotels across London to take the next step into stable accommodation.

Our newly established team, PSL (Private Sector Leasing), will sit within our floating support services working with people to start their tenancy well and support their wellbeing going forward. Thames Reach have the highest aspirations for those we work with, and the team will provide personalised support to help people realise their goals, ensuring that those accommodated by the ‘Everyone In’ initiative are suitably supported.

The PSL team are hiring now, across Support Worker, Senior Practitioner and Lead Manager roles. More information can be found here.

 

24 June 2020

Thames Reach welcome the government’s new £105million pool of funding to further support those who moved into the hotel system during the pandemic. We have been running hotels during this time, which are now closing due to our teams’ successful efforts in helping people move on, mainly into housing in the private rented sector; these individuals are now receiving support to ensure that they do not return to the streets.

This additional funding will help Thames Reach to continue this work of helping vulnerable and homeless people into secure, long-term accommodation. We acknowledge that this group has a range of needs; while some people currently in hotels will need access to long term supported accommodation, many will need help finding employment and getting a regular income as the key step towards finding their own housing.  We will continue to help people make these important steps which have the potential to give them the stability they need to move away from homelessness. 

Beyond people currently accommodated in hotels, we need to recognise that we are seeing increased numbers of new rough sleepers on to the streets, and that central government, local authorities and charities need to be able to respond quickly and effectively to prevent these people becoming part of a long-term homeless population.

17 June 2020

The ‘Everyone In’ project brought over 90% of the people known to be rough sleeping or accommodated in unsuitable shelter accommodation into hotels during quarantine, but now as the scheme is coming to a close, our focus is moving to ensuring that people have access to secure accommodation, and the support they need to sustain it. 

Thames Reach are helping people move on so that no one is left to go back to the streets. Our hotel for asymptomatic people in Westminster has now closed and there is a dedicated team providing support in moving people to new accommodation. The majority of residents in our hotel have been moved on, many to the private rented sector, and three have been relocated to another of the hotels while they receive further support they need to move on. Our Tenancy Sustainment Team will be expanding to ensure that we are able to provide support after the point of being settled into accommodation. More on the expansion of this service will be announced soon.

1 June 2020

Yesterday’s press briefing from central government included Dame Louise Casey, head of the Covid Rough Sleeping Taskforce. She said a few words about how the action is moving forward. She said that the ‘Everyone In’ initiative has been incredibly successful, having temporarily re-housed 15,000 people across England, allowing them to self-isolate and ultimately saving their lives in a pandemic. ‘Everyone In’ was a public health response to the crisis and a compassionate one. It has been an extraordinary response and highly collaborative, and Dame Louise thanked all agencies who have contributed to the process; we now must take this further and change lives for good.

Thames Reach are now working with the residents of the hotels and are securing move-on options for those without secure accommodation, to ensure no one is put back on the streets. More information to come soon. 

26 May 2020

Today saw central government announce a £433million investment for 6,000 homes for rough sleepers. Our Chief Executive, Bill Tidnam, says: “We welcome the investment in accommodation and crucially support for rough sleepers.  The challenge is now to mobilise this fast, to let people get out of hotels and move on with their lives.  We also need to make sure that we are able to use established approaches to continue to respond quickly and appropriately to people who are new to the streets before their homelessness becomes a way of life.”

Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government press release: ‘6,000 new supported homes as part of landmark commitment to end rough sleeping’ 

11 May 2020

As part of the response to the current pandemic we have opened a ‘Covid care’ hotel in Newham.  Working with staff from UCL hospital and MSF, the hotel provides temporary accommodation for those who have contracted the disease, after which they return to the hotel or hostel where they were staying.  This replaces the hotel in Westminster, which is now a ‘Covid protect’ scheme. Médicins Sans Frontieres (MSF) have put together a short video explaining the work that is being done at the Covid Care Hotel.

 
We have begun to work with people housed in hostels and other temporary accommodation by the Greater London Authority and local authorities, with the aim of this work being to conduct assessments with a view to identifying future accommodation options.  It’s worth noting that a very significant proportion of this group do not have a settled status, and unless this is resolved it is likely to be a significant barrier to future options. We will be outlining our issues and concerns for homeless and vulnerable people during the transition period in a statement to be released later in the process. 
 

5 April 2020

Thames Reach have been working with several agencies and partners to provide people sleeping rough at Heathrow Airport with a clean room and all meals to allow them to self-isolate effectively, in line with city-wide efforts to ensure that the most vulnerable are not left behind during the pandemic. We are incredibly proud of the work of our team as well as those from other organisations in what was a successful project. Support will now continue between the various organisations involved. Read the full story here

2 April 2020

Alongside many other of the UK’s providers in the homelessness sector, Thames Reach have co-signed an open letter to the Prime Minister expressing gratitude for the responses of local and central government in allowing us to provide temporary accommodation to people sleeping rough. However we have also clarified our needs going forward to help the most vulnerable groups. The letter is available to read here

30 March 2020

We are working with our partners, local authorities and other services to ensure that no one is left rough sleeping during these times of a global pandemic.

Thames Reach are working closely with our partners including local authorities, the Greater London Authority and Heathrow in order to get people who are rough sleeping in Heathrow into single room accommodation where they can follow government guidelines on self-isolation and social distancing.  Given the numbers of people involved this is a complex task, requiring us not only to obtain suitable accommodation, but also provide appropriate help as well as food and other services.   Other types of ‘shelter’ accommodation which involve high levels of sharing are not suitable in the current pandemic.

 Currently, anyone worried about someone rough sleeping is urged to contact Street Link, who will allow our teams to locate anyone in need of support. Anyone homeless or rough sleeping can contact the local authority (either independently or with the help of a support worker) and as hotel spaces suitable for self-isolation become available, which will be quicker than normal, they will be accommodated. We are continuing to provide outreach support 365 days a year. Provisions in hotels are being confirmed and progress is being made daily in order to make self-isolation possible. The pre-existing requirement of a local connection to a particular borough before receiving help has been lifted at this time.

 

 

27 March 2020

Last week, the government appointed Dame Louise Casey to lead its strategy on ensuring people experiencing rough sleeping are supported during the spread of COVID-19. At Thames Reach, we welcome the development of this strategy to protect the health of homeless people and the broader population. We are working as hard as we can to maintain essential services, such as outreach, hostels, supported housing and remote tenancy support. In addition, we are working with the Greater London Authority and local authorities to provide shelter for people experiencing homelessness, with hotel spaces allocated for those showing COVID-19 symptoms.

The basic principles of the strategy are to:

– focus on people who are, or are at risk of, sleeping rough, and those who are in accommodation where it is difficult to self-isolate, such as shelters and assessment centres

– make sure that these people have access to the facilities that enable them to adhere to public health guidance on hygiene or isolation, ideally single room facilities

– utilise alternative powers and funding to assist those with no recourse to public funds who require shelter and other forms of support due to the COVID-19 pandemic

– mitigate their own risk of infection, and transmission to others, by ensuring they are able to self-isolate as appropriate in line with public health guidance.

We will continue to update this page with news as the crisis develops.    

 

 

26 March 2020

During the coronavirus pandemic, vulnerable people and those experiencing street homelessness are even more at risk of health complications and require increased levels of support. At Thames Reach, we are prioritising our essential services, as well as working with our partners on developing new emergency services, so that we can continue to effectively support vulnerable people and safeguard their health. Rough sleeping can have a devastating impact on mental and physical health, and many people living on the street have serious underlying health conditions, and so during this period, when most of the population is being asked to stay at home, it is absolutely essential that we are able to provide people without a home of their own a place where they can safely self-isolate and receive the support that they need.

In order to meet these needs, we are working with the Greater London Authority and other local authorities and have a team coordinating rooms in a hotel in south-west London where homeless people who are showing symptoms of COVID-19 can self-isolate, whether they are street homeless or in a night shelter.

There is a rota of morning, late and night shifts covering the hotel. We are recruiting new staff to help with this urgent project, and in some cases staff are being re-deployed from other services to assist.

We are working with an on-site team of nurses and doctors to check on those self-isolating. The healthcare team decide when people can be discharged and leave. We welcome them, show them their rooms and provide them with breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks. For this element we are seeking partnerships with food outlets to help supply the large volume of extra food required. All this care is undertaken with full personal protective equipment (PPE) for staff, and PPE is given to the client as they arrive. Contact with guests and clients is mainly via phone and food is left for them at their doors. We are looking at expanding this service as the situation develops, as we are currently at a capacity for 32 people but will need to grow with demand.

As this is a large undertaking, Thames Reach are recruiting new staff, volunteers and seeking new partnerships to assist with food and PPE supplies during this unprecedented time. If you would like to help us keep the most vulnerable safe with your time or resources, please do get in touch at: enquiries@thamesreach.org.uk    

 

 

18 March 2020

At Thames Reach, we are closely monitoring developments relating to the spread of COVID-19 in order to best ensure the health and wellbeing of the homeless and vulnerable people we work with, as well as of our staff, volunteers, and the wider public. We are following advice issued by Public Health England and continuing conversations with commissioners, local providers, and health services so we can use the resources we have wisely, and to ensure that we are able to respond to this rapidly changing situation.

Our outreach teams work 365 days of the year, and we continue to go out to find people who are sleeping rough, offering them the support they need to get off the streets. These teams are advised to follow guidance provided by Public Health England with regard to people sleeping rough who are displaying coronavirus symptoms, and we are calling upon local authorities to provide environments where individuals can safely and securely self-isolate.

On behalf of Thames Reach, our Chief Executive, Bill Tidnam, has co-signed a letter to the government, along with senior figures from across the homelessness sector, outlining a set of measures that we believe will help protect homeless and vulnerable people during this ongoing crisis. This outline includes the request that homeless people should be allocated self-contained accommodation with sufficient resources with which to self-isolate. People who are rough sleeping are three times more likely to suffer with chronic illnesses including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and so must be supported as a matter of urgency.

The open letter can be read here, which we have signed with Crisis, Homeless Link, St Mungo’s, Centrepoint, The Passage, Groundswell, Shelter Cymru, Homeless Network Scotland and Connection at St Martin’s.

Thank you for your ongoing support during this challenging time.

 

A statement on COVID-19

A statement from Thames Reach on COVID-19 and our current response to the situation, as well as an open letter to the government, co-signed by Chief Executive Bill Tidnam

A statement on COVID-19

18 March 2020

At Thames Reach, we are closely monitoring developments relating to the spread of COVID-19 in order to best ensure the health and wellbeing of the homeless and vulnerable people we work with, as well as of our staff, volunteers, and the wider public. We are following advice issued by Public Health England and continuing conversations with commissioners, local providers, and health services so we can use the resources we have wisely, and to ensure that we are able to respond to this rapidly changing situation.

Our outreach teams work 365 days of the year, and we continue to go out to find people who are sleeping rough, offering them the support they need to get off the streets. These teams are advised to follow guidance provided by Public Health England with regard to people sleeping rough who are displaying coronavirus symptoms, and we are calling upon local authorities to provide environments where individuals can safely and securely self-isolate.

On behalf of Thames Reach, our Chief Executive, Bill Tidnam, has co-signed a letter to the government, along with senior figures from across the homelessness sector, outlining a set of measures that we believe will help protect homeless and vulnerable people during this ongoing crisis. This outline includes the request that homeless people should be allocated self-contained accommodation with sufficient resources with which to self-isolate. People who are rough sleeping are three times more likely to suffer with chronic illnesses including asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and so must be supported as a matter of urgency.

The open letter can be read below, which we have signed with Crisis, Homeless Link, St Mungo’s, Centrepoint, The Passage, Groundswell, Shelter Cymru, Homeless Network Scotland and Connection at St Martin’s.

Thank you for your ongoing support during this challenging time.

 

 

Dear Prime Minister, 

As Chief Executives of leading homelessness charities, we appreciate the significant pressure the Government is facing in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic and stand ready to lend our support as you set out plans to help protect the most vulnerable in our society, including people who are facing homelessness. 

People experiencing homelessness, particularly those who are rough sleeping, are especially vulnerable in this outbreak. They are three times more likely to experience a chronic health condition including asthma and COPD. It is therefore vital that they are recognised as a vulnerable group for the purposes of government planning. 

We note the publication of Public Health England’s information on COVID-19 for hostel or day centre providers of services for people experiencing rough sleeping. We are concerned that these measures however, fail to provide the much more comprehensive plan and wide-ranging action needed to ensure that everyone facing homelessness is provided with self-contained accommodation, to ensure that they can self-isolate, and that people experiencing financial hardship are not left facing homelessness as a result of the impact of COVID-19. 

Please find enclosed a full set of measures that we believe will help ensure people facing homelessness are protected during this period. 

As a matter of urgency, we are calling on governments to set out a plan, which will include detail on: 

• Assistance from the Government to secure hotel style accommodation to meet the increased need for self-contained accommodation so that people can self-isolate. 

• The removal of legal barriers in the homelessness legislation so that anyone who is at risk of, or is already homeless, can access self-contained accommodation. This should also include a suspension of rules that prevent people with no recourse to public funds from accessing housing and homelessness assistance. 

 • The provision of additional financial support through the Universal Credit system to ensure that people are not pushed into homelessness. 

• Protecting renters from evictions by temporarily suspending the use of Section 21 and Section 8 evictions. 

• Increasing the fund for Discretionary Housing Payments to help renters facing homelessness. 

• Measures to ensure that people sleeping rough and living in hostels and shelter accommodation have rapid access to testing for the virus and healthcare assistance. 

• An assurance that frontline workers in homelessness organisations are recognised as an emergency service as part of the response to COVID-19. 

• A ringfenced proportion of the £5bn fund announced in the Budget last week to fight COVID-19 for local authorities to help deliver these measures. 

In light of the speed of recent developments, we would welcome the opportunity to discuss with you and your officials as a matter of urgency how we can help to deliver this plan.  

Yours sincerely, 

Jon Sparkes, Crisis 

Rick Henderson, Homeless Link 

Howard Sinclair, St Mungo’s 

Seyi Obakin, Centrepoint 

Mick Clarke, The Passage 

Steven Platts, Groundswell 

John Puzey, Shelter Cymru 

Margaret-Ann Brünjes, Homeless Network Scotland

 Pam Orchard, Connection at St Martin’s 

Bill Tidnam, Thames Reach 

cc. Rt. Hon. Nicola Sturgeon MSP, Rt Hon. Mark Drakeford AM, Rt Hon. Matt Hancock MP

Homelessness and housing organisations respond to Government Rough Sleeping Strategy

Thames Reach welcomes the Government’s new rough sleeping strategy

Homelessness and housing organisations respond to Government Rough Sleeping Strategy

The Government today releases its rough sleeping strategy, the first since announcing its commitment to halve the number of people sleeping on the streets by 2022 and to end the problem by 2027.

Responding, housing and homelessness organisations who were part of the strategy’s Rough Sleeping Advisory Group issued a joint statement saying:

“This strategy is a significant step towards the government’s goal of ending rough sleeping by 2027, which will make a real difference to people’s lives. As members of the advisory panel, we welcome the new funding commitment for dedicated outreach teams and for emergency bed spaces, while the announcement of nationwide trials of a ‘somewhere safe to stay’ duty and the review of the vagrancy act have the potential to pave the way for desperately needed reforms, preventing people sleeping rough.

“However, for the strategy to work, the government must also set out bold, cross-departmental plans to tackle the root causes of all forms of homelessness, and prevent it from happening in the first place. This must include plans to build significantly more social housing, to foster greater security for renters, to ensure people have access to benefits and other support they need to help them keep their homes. We also need to see a reversal of policies that leave migrants homeless and destitute, and healthcare, mental health and substance misuse services that are available and truly accessible to those who need it.

“To end rough sleeping by 2027, the government must build on today’s welcome announcement and set out plans to prevent homelessness from occurring in the first place. The ambitious target that the government has set itself will only be achieved if it is equally bold on addressing the polices that cause rough sleeping.”

Responding further, Bill Tidnam, Chief Executive at Thames Reach said:

“Rough sleeping is both dangerous and distressing and nobody should have to sleep rough on the streets.

“We’re pleased new measures are being taken to ensure people receive the right support to move away from homelessness.

“We welcome this strategy and its investment, and believe it’s an encouraging start in ending rough sleeping.

“We particularly welcome funding from the Department of Health, and the commitment this provides in ensuring that homeless people have access to the health services they need; as well as the recognition of the specific needs of migrant rough sleepers, who currently have few realistic options available to them. There needs to be an ongoing discussion around how this funding will be spent to effectively support this group to move into affordable accommodation and work.

“The real work now begins on implementing this strategy, ensuring a level of agreement and understanding so work can get underway, and making sure we all listen and learn from all lessons along the way”.